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The Association of Trajectories of Protein Intake and Age-Specific Protein Intakes from 2 to 22 Years with BMI in Early Adulthood

Citation

Wright, M.; Sotres-Alvarez, D.; Mendez, M. A.; & Adair, L. (2017). The Association of Trajectories of Protein Intake and Age-Specific Protein Intakes from 2 to 22 Years with BMI in Early Adulthood. British Journal of Nutrition, 117(5), 750-758.

Abstract

No study has analysed how protein intake from early childhood to young adulthood relate to adult BMI in a single cohort. To estimate the association of protein intake at 2, 11, 15, 19 and 22 years with age- and sex-standardised BMI at 22 years (early adulthood), we used linear regression models with dietary and anthropometric data from a Filipino birth cohort (1985-2005, n 2586). We used latent growth curve analysis to identify trajectories of protein intake relative to age-specific recommended daily allowance (intake in g/kg body weight) from 2 to 22 years, then related trajectory membership to early adulthood BMI using linear regression models. Lean mass and fat mass were secondary outcomes. Regression models included socioeconomic, dietary and anthropometric confounders from early life and adulthood. Protein intake relative to needs at age 2 years was positively associated with BMI and lean mass at age 22 years, but intakes at ages 11, 15 and 22 years were inversely associated with early adulthood BMI. Individuals were classified into four mutually exclusive trajectories: (i) normal consumers (referent trajectory, 58 % of cohort), (ii) high protein consumers in infancy (20 %), (iii) usually high consumers (18 %) and (iv) always high consumers (5 %). Compared with the normal consumers, 'usually high' consumption was inversely associated with BMI, lean mass and fat mass at age 22 years whereas 'always high' consumption was inversely associated with male lean mass in males. Proximal protein intakes were more important contributors to early adult BMI relative to early-childhood protein intake; protein intake history was differentially associated with adulthood body size.

Reference Type

Journal Article

Year Published

2017

Journal Title

British Journal of Nutrition

Author(s)

Wright, M.
Sotres-Alvarez, D.
Mendez, M. A.
Adair, L.